Sanskrit writing dating back a thousand years.
Another ruined temple. This set of three towers is in very poor shape. Today's tour was the "Obscure Tour", where we got to go to ruins that are hardly ever visited.
Judging by the wear and age of the support structures, it's been a long time since anyone worked on fixing up these temples!
This set of temples were back a ways, down dirt roads and muddy rice fields. There were a few huts nearby, and the locals came out to check us out. Some very cute little kids came out to sell us some post cards and hand made crafts.
Another temple gate. It had rained the night before, so this government gate keeper was bailing out the puddle in front of it.
The traditional 4 heads on top of the city/temple gate.
There was a crew of about 200 workers clearing bushes, shrubs and cleaning out the moat at this temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple, with a worker cleaning vegetation away.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
Teresa posing in a door way.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple with workers in blue clearing brush.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple, with two shady characters posing under a spooky tree.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A shot of a typical field of rice in Cambodia.
A Tuk Tuk driving by with a passenger.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
Mike taking a shot of a carving
A Khymer Carving
This carving has a small rabbit in it
Teresa strikes a pose!
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
This tree had some serious protection on it. They used to make criminals climb these trees naked. Encouraged to do so with prods from spears from behind.
A temple tree growing over the temple gate door.
Teresa posing with little girl selling hand made flutes inside these hand woven tubes.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
The great jungle/temple explorer!
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
Umbrellas...for rain or sun protection!
Water Buffalo grazing next to a ruined temple
One of the 4 gates to Angkor Thom
Gate Budda
A view of the gate statues from on top the 50 foot wall.
Mike and the Budda
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
Teresa on the steps...
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
Do you see the cat asleep on the temple?
A closer look...do you see the cat now?
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
Looking down the steps. Very steep...
Another hot and sunny day. This temple had bullet holes too. And some graves of soldiers killed on this spot during the Khymer Rouge war in the 1970's.
One of the 4 gates, this one is almost never seen by tourists.
From the outside looking in. There used to be alot of fighting at this gate during the recent war.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple.
A picture of a ruined Khymer Kingdom Temple. This one was being repaired by Communist China There was a stone cutting workshop in the back, and alot of repairs had been done. You can really see the bright orange new stone..
Of all the temples we saw being worked on, this one had the most amount of repairs that had been done, and was the only one we saw with actual people replacing stone. You could actually see old/new...the only temple like this!
On our last day we took a vehicle deep into the Cambodian Jungle. After a long drive up into the mountains and into a Cambodian National Park, we arrived at this location, high up in the hills.
This place is called the "Thousand Lingas" because a thousand of these had been carved into the river. Bathing and drinking this water, which had passed over a thousand lingas was susposed to be very good luck.
The three of us also went to a current and modern temple.
There was alot of concrete used in this buddhist temple, but the architecture was true, and it was very cool to see.
High up one of these boulders we climbed stairs in our bare feet. Looking down from the railing, you could see all of this limestone type boulders.
Inside a building at the top was this carved Buda. This is actually the top of the hill, carved and painted. Real large gems are set into the eyes.
Looking down at one of the monk's houses, you can see how all the rain water is caught and collected for later use.
Our guide pours water over the local shrine's "Linga", and Teresa gets some good luck.
Then Mike got some good luck...
And not to be left out, so did I...
Then we journed further on, and went to a waterfall area. Above a set of several waterfalls is this stone carving in the water. This carving dates back about a thousand years, and has a Budah and some other animals carved into the river bed.
Mike and I actually went swimming in the lower falls. It was a lot of fun, and it was a good long drive to get there. We got to see a bit of the country, which I really enjoyed. This is us just walking along the river bed below the upper smaller falls.