Hawaii 2011Trip - Page 4
About every 10 minutes the dancers would change costumes for the diferent polynesian islands, which have slightly different styles. Here is Fiji style...
The Tahiti style...
Hawaiian Style...
Teresa's favorite was the Samoan Firedance this gentleman did...
Going from one torch to two...
Spinning both very fast....
Then a finale, Hawaiian style...

We were in a ground floor room, and there are many hotel cats. These two came by and walked into our room to say "hi"....:)

The next morning we took off to go to Kealakekua Bay. At the pickup point, which was Keauhou Bay, south of Kona City, we saw many people doing outrigger paddeling. Many of them were seniors, and we reflected on how nice it would be to retire, and do this kind of thing most days.
Here they are hauling their outrigger canoe back up onto the clubs beach/storage area.

A sea turtle or three cruised around the dock area.

Looking back at Keaohou Bay and the many villas and condo's surrounding it on the hills.

We took a large tour catarmeran with about 60 people on it about 20 miles south to Kealakekua Bay.

Kealakekua Bay is located on the Kona coast of the island of Hawai'i about 12 miles (19 km) south of Kailua-Kona. Settled over a thousand years ago, the surrounding area contains many archeological and historical sites such as religious temples, and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places listings on the island of Hawaii in 1973 as the Kealakekua Bay Historical District. The bay is a marine life conservation district, a popular destination for kayaking, Scuba diving and snorkeling.

Settlement on Kealakekua Bay has a long history. Hikiau Heiau was a luakini temple of Ancient Hawaii at the south end of the bay, associated with funeral rites. The large platform of volcanic rock was originally over 16 feet (4.9 m) high, 250 feet (76 m) long, and 100 feet (30 m) wide. The sheer cliff face called Pali Kapu O Keoua overlooking the bay was the burial place of Hawaiian royalty. The name means "forbidden cliffs of Keoua " in honor of Keoua Nui, sometimes known as the "father of kings" since many rulers were his descendants. The difficulty in accessing the cliff kept the exact burial places secret.

The village of Ka'awaloa was at the north end of the bay in ancient times, where the Puhina O Lono Heiau was built, along with some royal residences. The name of the village means "the distant Kava", from the medicinal plant used in religious rituals. The name of the bay comes from ke ala ke kua in the Hawaiian Language which means "the god's pathway" because this area was the focus of extensive Makahiki celebrations in honor of the god Lono. Another name for the area north of the bay was hale ki'i, due to the large number of wood carvings, better known today as "tiki".

Although there are theories that Spanish or Dutch sailors might have stopped here much earlier, the first documented European to arrive was in 1779. Captain James Cook and his ships, the Resolution and Discovery, first sighted Kealakekua Bay on the morning of January 17, 1779. He estimated several thousand people lived in the two villages. On January 28, he performed the first Christian service on the islands, for the funeral of a crew member who had died


Ka'awaloa in 1779 by John Webber, artist aboard Cook's shipUnbeknownst to him, Cook had entered the bay during Makahiki, which might have led some of the Hawaiians to think he was part of the Lono festivities. This was also a traditionally peaceful time of year, so he was welcomed and given food. Cook and his crew stayed for several weeks, returning to sea shortly after the end of the festival; but after suffering damage during a storm, the ships returned two weeks later on February 14, 1779. This time relations were not as smooth.

After some Hawaiians took one of Resolution's small boats, Cook attempted to lure Hawaiian chief Kalani'opu'u aboard until the boat was returned. A skirmish ensued during which Cook was struck in the head and stabbed, on nearly the very spot where he had first set foot on the island. This death was depicted in a series of paintings Death of Cook.

Several local businesses use "Captain Cook" in their name. In fact, the traditional land division (ahupua?a) of Kealakekua, is now known as Captain Cook, Hawaii due to a post office located in the Captain Cook Coffee Company store, up the slopes of Mauna Loa. The town now called Kealakekua, Hawaii, was in the land division known as Haleki'i.

I get ready to dive from about 15 feet up into the 40 foot depths. I'm wearing my nifty SPF50 sunscreen shirt....

Here I go....I dove in about 4 times to get this shot...:)

The water was very warm, and the three of us had a great time snorkeling around looking at the coral and fish.
Thomas gets ready to dive. Even Teresa dove. There were also two slides at the front of the boat. We had a breakfast and lunch on the ship, and spent wonderful hours here.
In goes Thomas!
The waters here blow away anything available at Waikiki....
Visibility was about 80+ feet...
Tons and tons of coral and fish.
A large white stone monument was built in 1874 on the order of Princess Likelike and was deeded to the United Kingdom in 1877. The chain around the monument is supported by four cannon from the ship HMS Fantome placed with their breaches embedded in the rock in 1876. It marks the approximate location of Cook's death. The inscription reads:

In Memory of the great circumnavigator Captain James Cook, R.N. who discovered these islands on the 18th of January, 1778, and fell near this spot on the 14th of February, 1779.

Unfortunately you cannot simply drive to the monument; this remote location is only accessible by water or a steep trail. Many visitors rent a kayak and paddle across the bay, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from its southern end. The pier at Napo'opo'o can be accessed down a narrow road off the Hawaii Belt Road. The beach sand was mostly removed by Hurricane Iniki in 1992. Boat tours are also available leaving from Honokohau harbor, Keauhou Bay, and the Kailua pier.
The next day we went SCUBA diving, thru Kona Honu Divers. We got up early and arrived in Kona City, signed up, Thomas got his NITROX tanks checked, and we drove to the docks. Here the crew get the 36 foot "Honu Iki".
A little bit of yawning here....
Teresa puts on her wetsuit...
Thomas gets into his. The company gave us 5mm suits, which kept us nice and warm.